Denver Horror Collective’s UNHOLY TRINITY

Have you picked up copies of Denver Horror Collective’s terrifyingly popular, award-winning, and best-selling anthologies yet?

TERROR AT 5280′ (edited by Denver Horror Collective)

Dark tales set in and around Colorado, penned exclusively by local authors, including Stephen Graham Jones, Carter Wilson, and more…

($14.95 paperback / $2.99 e-book / $7.49 audiobook)

CONSUMED: TALES INSPIRED BY THE WENDIGO (edited by Hollie & Henry Snider)

From desolate snowy mountains and apocalyptic wastelands to New York’s sex clubs and virtual encounters, Denver Horror Collective brings you visions of horror inspired by the Wendigo. Featuring Steve Rasnic Tem, Dana Fredsti, Wrath James White, and more…

($15.95 paperback / $9.99 e-book)

THE JEWISH BOOK OF HORROR (edited by Josh Schlossberg)

Whether it’s pirate rabbis or demon-slaying Bible queens, concentration camp vampires or beloved, fearless bubbies, THE JEWISH BOOK OF HORROR offers you twenty-two dark tales about the culture, history, and folklore of the Jewish people. Featuring Daniel Braum, Elana Gomel, Ken Goldman, and more…

$16.99 paperback / $7.99 e-book

Or purchase all three paperback titles for only $40 (plus shipping) by emailing submissions [at] denverhorror [dot] com

THE JEWISH BOOK OF HORROR Wins Silver Medal in Godless’ 666 Awards

Thanks to Godless for recognizing THE JEWISH BOOK OF HORROR with a Silver Medal in the Anthology / Collection category for this year’s 666 Awards.

THE JEWISH BOOK OF HORROR on Preliminary Ballot for Bram Stoker Awards

Thanks to Horror Writers Association for including Denver Horror Collective’s THE JEWISH BOOK OF HORROR on the preliminary ballot for the “Superior Achievement in an Anthology” category for the 2022 Bram Stoker Awards.

Congrats to editor Josh Schlossberg and all the authors.

Reviews of THE JEWISH BOOK OF HORROR

A list of some of the reviews of THE JEWISH BOOK OF HORROR!

Publishers Weekly:

“A superior anthology with a fascinating origin story…[that] demonstrates the compatibility of Jewish tradition, history, and folklore with the horror genre.”

Bookishly Jewish:

“Marginalized writers are taking back the genre, using it to confront some of their own demons and show the world the horrors they personally experience. Instead of making me feel nauseous and sick, these stories inform and empower.”

Midwest Book Review:

“Each tale comes steeped in a background of Jewish lives and traditions. Each holds a powerful key to understanding the varied sources of horror in adversities that challenge heart, soul, and spiritual wellsprings alike.”

Horror Addicts:

“A dark, informative and entertaining read…it carries the weight of one of the oldest traditions in the world.”

HorrorNews.Net:

“The Jewish Book of Horror beckons a vast audience to enlighten, entertain and terrify…This collection of dark, ancient and contemporary mayhem can be equally enjoyed with an initial perusal and returning to the promised land time and again.”

Unsettling Reads:

“There were so many real life horrors mentioned in many of the stories in the collection, which added another layer of emotion for me… There were moments when I knew I was reading a fictional horror collection, but it was hard to differentiate the fine line between the truth of the past and the creative fiction of the authors.”

One-Sentence Reviews:

“The best anthology I’ve read all year!”

The Horror Tree:

“An anthology well worth reading.”

Horror Addicts Reviews THE JEWISH BOOK OF HORROR

“The Jewish Book of Horror, ed. Josh Schlossberg (pub. Denver Horror Collective) is a dark, informative and entertaining read. I was drawn to this book because I was wondering how can a people, who have endured so much during the history of the human race, create fictional horror and I also wanted to know what was different about ‘Jewish’ horror compared to standard offerings.”

FULL REVIEW at HorrorAddicts.net.

Midwest Book Review on THE JEWISH BOOK OF HORROR

http://www.midwestbookreview.com/mbw/dec_21.htm#dianedonovan

Many readers may be surprised at the association between ‘Jewish’ and traditional horror writing, but as this collection shows, Jewish history and legends hold strong roots in depictions of horror. The Jewish Book of Horror presents both sample stories and introductory discussions of the tradition.

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