8 Stories from THE JEWISH BOOK OF HORROR on Ellen Datlow’s “Long List” for Best Horror of the Year

One’s taste in art is, of course, highly subjective. However, if you share editor Ellen Datlow’s predilections for horror fiction, you might want to know that 8 stories from THE JEWISH BOOK OF HORROR (edited by Josh Schlossberg, published by Denver Horror Collective), made it onto her “long list” for Best Horror of the Year #14.

“The Hand of Fire” by Daniel Braum

“The Last Plague” by KD Casey

“On Seas of Blood and Salt” by Richard Dansky

“Bread and Salt” by Elana Gomel

“How to Build a Sukkah at the End of the World” by Lindsey King-Miller

“The Rabbi’s Wife” by Simon Rosenberg

“Ba’alat Ov” by Brenda Tolian

“A Purim Story” by Emily Ruth Verona

THE JEWISH BOOK OF HORROR is available online and in bookstores around the world.

TERROR TUESDAY: Elana Gomel

DHC member Elana Gomel is the author of more than one hundred short stories, several novellas, and four novels. Her story, “Where the Streets Have No Name,” was the winner of the 2020 Gravity Award, “Mine Seven” is included in THE BEST HORROR OF THE YEAR 13 edited by Ellen Datlow, and “Bread and Salt” appears in THE JEWISH BOOK OF HORROR.

Gomel’s new dark fantasy novel, BLACK HOUSE, “combines the terror of HOUSE OF LEAVES with the adventures of Narnia.”

Behold: THE JEWISH BOOK OF HORROR on Amazon Today!

𝐓𝐇𝐄 𝐉𝐄𝐖𝐈𝐒𝐇 𝐁𝐎𝐎𝐊 𝐎𝐅 𝐇𝐎𝐑𝐑𝐎𝐑 𝐢𝐬 𝐚𝐯𝐚𝐢𝐥𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐩𝐚𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐛𝐚𝐜𝐤 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐞-𝐛𝐨𝐨𝐤 𝐓𝐎𝐃𝐀𝐘 (𝐇𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰𝐞𝐞𝐧) 𝐭𝐡𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡 𝐀𝐦𝐚𝐳𝐨𝐧!

Edited by Josh Schlossberg, this “superior anthology” (Publishers Weekly) offers you twenty-two dark tales about the culture, history, and folklore of the Jewish people.

Publishers Weekly on THE JEWISH BOOK OF HORROR

Here’s what Publishers Weekly has to say about THE JEWISH BOOK OF HORROR, due out Halloween 2021:

“Schlossberg brings together a superior anthology with a fascinating origin story…[that] ably demonstrates the compatibility of Jewish tradition, history, and folklore with the horror genre…This is sure to please fans of folklore-infused horror.”

Read the full review at Publishers Weekly.