About joshsworstnightmare

Author Josh Schlossberg surveys the dark landscape of today's horror fiction.

Call for Submissions: Terror at 5280’

Call for Submissions: Terror at 5280’

Denver Horror Press is seeking the best in local horror fiction to publish in our upcoming anthology, Terror at 5280’.

We’re looking for short stories related to or taking place in or around Denver, Colorado (bonus points for including local lore or haunts) written by authors currently living in Colorado (stories written by those outside of Colorado will not be considered).

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Playing with Fear

– by Bobby Crew

Playing with your fears is the sure way to make them your friends, in my highly-valued opinion, that is. But before I explain… I’ll just show you an example of how I like to play. This prose poem below is how I turned one of my fears into who I now call Big D.

Ryan Eldon Holmbeck

Photo: Ryan Eldon Holmbeck


A Tribute to Big D

I am well acquainted with Big D; we are beyond a first name basis, Death and I. A few times a year he drops by to see me, just to say hello—although sometimes I really wish he’d call first. I always like to clean up a little before guests come over. You know, shove everything in the closet and under the bed, vacuum, wash a few dishes, fill the rooms with sweet fragrance, and buy a bottle of tequila.

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Blurred Lines: Newswriting and Horror Fiction

– by Josh Schlossberg

blood-with-penPeople often act surprised when I tell them I’m both a journalist and a horror fiction writer.

I mean, I get it: In many ways the two fields don’t even occupy the same landscape. In one, shameless hacks make up fake stories to exploit the most depraved aspects of the human experience, while the other is a celebrated genre of literature popularized by respected writers such as Bram Stoker, H.P. Lovecraft, and Stephen King.

Seriously, though, while quality journalism presents a spectrum of viewpoints all at once, horror fiction is typically about seeing the world through the biased (even warped) lens of one character at a time.

The mechanics of the writing itself also tend to differ, where spare and simple prose best conveys the facts essential to newswriting, while in fiction colorful word choice and stylistic phrasing amplify a writer’s unique voice.

But the lines can—and often do—blur. Whether it’s an article delving into the gun control debate or a story about swimmers devoured by a lake monster, both crafts are driven by our inborn attraction to conflict.

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